Hypnosis - Adventist HealthCare

Hypnosis

Topic Overview

What is hypnosis?

Hypnosis is a state of focused concentration during which a person becomes less aware of his or her surroundings. Hypnotherapy is the use of hypnosis to treat physical or psychological conditions.

During a hypnotic state (trance), a person may be more likely to accept suggestions that can help change his or her behavior. A therapist (hypnotherapist) can lead the hypnosis, or he or she can teach people to hypnotize themselves (self-hypnosis). You can also learn self-hypnosis from books.

The hypnotherapist's goal is not to control a person or give the person answers but rather to help the person solve his or her own problems.

Self-hypnosis usually consists of writing or adapting a script to induce hypnosis (including suggestions to help with specific problems), recording the script, and playing the tape to become hypnotized. Some people are more comfortable with self-hypnosis because they are alone throughout the exercise and are in control of all suggestions made during the hypnotic trance.

Hypnosis does not work for everyone. You must be willing to focus your attention and follow the suggestions of the therapist. Contrary to popular belief, you cannot be hypnotized unwillingly. Also, when you are hypnotized, you will not follow directions against your wishes.

Experts do not know how hypnosis works, but it seems to put the body in a state of deep relaxation.

Some people believe hypnosis causes the brain to release natural substances that affect the way you perceive pain and other symptoms. Others believe hypnosis acts on the unconscious mind and allows you to control body reactions that you cannot normally control, such as blood pressure, heartbeat, and hunger.

What is hypnosis used for?

Hypnosis is not intended to cure disease but rather to relieve symptoms of illness. Hypnosis has been effective in relieving pain associated with surgery, paralysis, and childbirth. Also, it is widely used to control addictions to drugs, alcohol, food, and smoking. Hypnosis can reduce stress by increasing relaxation, offering positive suggestions, and eliminating negative thoughts.

Hypnosis can help with anxiety, insomnia, phobias, obesity, asthma, quitting smoking, and irritable bowel syndrome. Research has also found that it can reduce cancer-related pain, labor pain, nausea, and vomiting. In some cases hypnosis is combined with cognitive therapy or other relaxation and behavioral techniques.

Is hypnosis safe?

No formal licensing exists in the United States to govern hypnotherapists. It is important to find a health professional with extensive training and experience in hypnotherapy. Many psychologists, counselors, doctors, and dentists are experienced in hypnotherapy.

Self-hypnosis is also considered safe, even when done by inexperienced people. There are no reported cases of harm resulting from self-hypnosis. But do not perform self-hypnosis while you are driving a vehicle or are in any situation where you need to be fully alert or able to respond quickly (for example, while operating machinery or while supervising children).

Talk with your doctor about any complementary health practice that you would like to try or are already using. Your doctor can help you manage your health better if he or she knows about all of your health practices.

References

Other Works Consulted

  • Bennett PW (2013). Placebo and the power to heal. In JE Pizzorno, MT Murray, eds., Textbook of Natural Medicine, 4th ed., pp. 69–87. St. Louis: Mosby.
  • Freeman L (2009). Hypnosis. In L Freeman, ed., Mosby's Complementary and Alternative Medicine: A Research-Based Approach, 3rd ed., pp. 215–251. St. Louis: Mosby Elsevier.
  • Rodgers D, Micozzi MS (2011). Mind-body modalities. In MS Micozzi, ed., Fundamentals of Complementary and Integrative Medicine, 4th ed., pp. 106–129. St. Louis: Elsevier Saunders.

Credits

Current as ofJune 28, 2018

Author: Healthwise Staff
Medical Review: Adam Husney, MD - Family Medicine

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