Bupropion (Zyban) for Quitting Smoking - Adventist HealthCare

Bupropion (Zyban) for Quitting Smoking

Examples

Generic Name Brand Name
bupropion Zyban

How It Works

Bupropion is a pill you take to reduce your craving for tobacco. The way it does this is not entirely known. Bupropion does not contain nicotine and does not help you quit smoking in the same way that nicotine replacement therapy does. But like other medicines, it decreases cravings and withdrawal symptoms.

Doctors also prescribe bupropion (under the brand name Wellbutrin) to treat depression. But bupropion's ability to help people quit smoking is not related to its antidepressant action. It can help you stop smoking even if you do not have depression.

You begin taking bupropion daily, 1 to 2 weeks before you quit smoking. This builds up the level of medicine in your body. You take bupropion for 7 to 12 weeks after you stop using tobacco. You can take it for as long as 6 months to a year.

Why It Is Used

Bupropion is approved for use in people who smoke 10 or more cigarettes a day and are at least 18 years old. Doctors prescribe it to help people when they quit smoking.

You should not take bupropion if you:

  • Are already taking other medicines that contain bupropion (such as Wellbutrin).
  • Have seizures or a medical condition that makes you prone to seizures.
  • Are taking a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI).
  • Have an eating disorder.
  • Have an alcohol use problem.

How Well It Works

Bupropion works just as well as nicotine replacement therapies (NRTs). Using bupropion along with nicotine replacement therapy (such as nicotine patches, gum, or inhaler) may increase your chances of success.

Taken as directed, bupropion reduces:

  • Craving.
  • Irritability, restlessness, anxiety.
  • Difficulty concentrating.
  • Feelings of unhappiness or depression.

Side Effects

Common side effects include:footnote 1

  • Dry mouth, affecting 1 out of 10 people who use bupropion.
  • Difficulty sleeping (insomnia). If you take a morning and evening dose, taking the evening dose in the afternoon may help with sleep problems. Take the evening dose at least 8 hours after the morning dose.

In over 70 out of 100 people who use bupropion, the above side effects go away within about a week after they stop taking the medicine. Only about 10 out of 100 people have to stop taking bupropion because of side effects.

Less common side effects (occurring in less than 10 out of 100 people) include:

  • Dizziness.
  • Difficulty concentrating.
  • Upset stomach (nausea).
  • Anxiety.
  • Constipation.
  • Tremors.
  • Skin problems or rashes.

There is a small risk of having seizures when using bupropion. The risk increases if you have had seizures in the past.

See Drug Reference for a full list of side effects. (Drug Reference is not available in all systems.)

What To Think About

Like other treatments, bupropion works best when it is part of a program that includes setting a quit date; having a plan for dealing with things that make you reach for a cigarette (smoking triggers); and getting support from a doctor, counselor, or support group.

Using bupropion along with nicotine replacement therapy (such as nicotine patches, gum, or inhaler) may work better than either therapy alone. Talk to your doctor before combining bupropion with nicotine replacement therapy.

If you are pregnant, breastfeeding, or planning to get pregnant, do not use any medicines unless your doctor tells you to. Some medicines can harm your baby. This includes prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, herbs, and supplements. And make sure that all your doctors know that you are pregnant, breastfeeding, or planning to get pregnant.

Complete the new medication information form (PDF)( What is a PDF document? ) to help you understand this medication.

References

Citations

  1. Drugs for tobacco dependence (2008). Treatment Guidelines From The Medical Letter, 6(73): 61–66.

Credits

Current as ofSeptember 26, 2018

Author: Healthwise Staff
Medical Review: Adam Husney, MD - Family Medicine
Kathleen Romito, MD - Family Medicine
Elizabeth T. Russo, MD - Internal Medicine
Michael F. Bierer, MD - Internal Medicine,

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