Ligustrum - Adventist HealthCare

Ligustrum

Uses

Botanical names:
Ligustrum lucidum

Parts Used & Where Grown

This shrub is native to China and eastern Asia and is now grown ornamentally in the United States. The berry of ligustrum is used medicinally.

What Are Star Ratings?

This supplement has been used in connection with the following health conditions:

Used for Why
1 Star
Immune Function
Refer to label instructions
Ligustrum appears to stimulate the immune system and is often combined with astragalus in traditional Chinese medicine.
The main active compound in ligustrum is ligustrin (oleanolic acid). Studies, mostly conducted in China, suggest that ligustrum stimulates the immune system. Ligustrum is often combined with astragalus in traditional Chinese medicine. Although used for long-term support of the immune system in people with depressed immune function or cancer, more research is needed to demonstrate the optimal length of time to use ligustrum.
1 Star
Infection
Refer to label instructions
Ligustrum supports the immune system and protects against microbes.

Herbs that support a person's immune system in the fight against microbes include the following: American ginseng, andrographis, Asian ginseng, astragalus, coriolus, eleuthero, ligustrum, maitake, picrorhiza, reishi, schisandra, and shiitake.

Traditional Use (May Not Be Supported by Scientific Studies)

Since ancient times, ligustrum berries have been employed as a "yin" tonic in Traditional Chinese Medicine.1 Ligustrum was used for a wide range of conditions, including premature aging and ringing in the ears.2

How It Works

Botanical names:
Ligustrum lucidum

How It Works

The major constituent in ligustrum is ligustrin (oleanolic acid). Preliminary studies, mostly conducted in China, suggest that ligustrum stimulates the immune system, decreases inflammation, and protects the liver.3 Ligustrum is often combined with astragalus in Traditional Chinese Medicine. Although used for long-term support of the immune system in people with depressed immune function or cancer, more research is needed to demonstrate the optimal length of time to use ligustrum.

How to Use It

Powdered, encapsulated berries, 1–3 teaspoons (5–15 grams) per day, are sometimes recommended.4 A similar amount of berries can be made into tea by adding 1/2–1 teaspoon (2–5 grams) of powdered or crushed berries to 1 cup (250 ml) of boiling water and steeping for ten to fifteen minutes. Alternatively, 3/4–1 teaspoon (3–5 ml) of tincture three times per day can be taken.

Interactions

Botanical names:
Ligustrum lucidum

Interactions with Supplements, Foods, & Other Compounds

At the time of writing, there were no well-known supplement or food interactions with this supplement.

Interactions with Medicines

As of the last update, we found no reported interactions between this supplement and medicines. It is possible that unknown interactions exist. If you take medication, always discuss the potential risks and benefits of adding a new supplement with your doctor or pharmacist.
The Drug-Nutrient Interactions table may not include every possible interaction. Taking medicines with meals, on an empty stomach, or with alcohol may influence their effects. For details, refer to the manufacturers' package information as these are not covered in this table. If you take medications, always discuss the potential risks and benefits of adding a supplement with your doctor or pharmacist.

Side Effects

Botanical names:
Ligustrum lucidum

Side Effects

At the time of writing, there were no well-known side effects caused by this supplement.

References

1. Benksy D, Gamble A, Kaptchuk T. Chinese Herbal Medicine: Materia Medica. Seattle: Eastland Press, 1993, 366.

2. Leung AY, Foster S. Encyclopedia of Common Natural Ingredients Used in Foods, Drugs, and Cosmetics, 2d ed. New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1996, 350-2.

3. Leung AY, Foster S. Encyclopedia of Common Natural Ingredients Used in Foods, Drugs, and Cosmetics, 2d ed. New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1996, 350-2.

4. Foster S, Yue CX. Herbal Emissaries: Bringing Chinese Herbs to the West. Rochester, VT: Healing Arts Press, 1992, 227-32.

Disclaimer: The information contained in this website, and its associated websites, is provided as a benefit to the local community, and the Internet community in general; it does not constitute medical advice. We try to provide quality information, but we make no claims, promises or guarantees about the accuracy, completeness, or adequacy of the information contained in or linked to this website and its associated sites. As medical advice must be tailored to the specific circumstances of each patient and healthcare is constantly changing, nothing provided herein should be used as a substitute for the advice of a competent physician. Furthermore, in providing this service, Adventist HealthCare does not condone or support all of the content covered in this site. As an Adventist health care organization, Adventist HealthCare acts in accordance with the ethical and religious directives for Adventist health care services.

Find a Doctor

Find an Adventist HealthCare affiliated doctor by calling our FREE physician referral service at 800-642-0101 or by searching our online physician directory.

View Doctors

Set Your Location

Setting your location helps us to show you nearby providers and locations based on your healthcare needs.