Adenosine Monophosphate

Adenosine Monophosphate

Uses

Adenosine monophosphate (AMP) is an intermediary substance formed during the body's process of creating energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from food.

What Are Star Ratings?

This supplement has been used in connection with the following health conditions:

Used for Why
1 Star
Photosensitivity
Refer to label instructions
According to one report, about half of the people with porphyria cutanea tarda who took adenosine monophosphate saw complete alleviation of their photosensitivity.

Adenosine monophosphate (AMP) is a substance made in the body that is also distributed as a supplement, although it is not widely available. According to one report, 90% of people with porphyria cutanea tarda responded well to 160 to 200 mg of AMP per day taken for at least one month. Complete alleviation of photosensitivity occurred in about half of the people who took AMP.

1 Star
Shingles and Postherpetic Neuralgia
Refer to label instructions
Adenosine monophosphate has been found to speed healing, reduce the duration of pain of shingles, and prevent the development of postherpetic neuralgia.

Adenosine monophosphate (AMP), a compound that occurs naturally in the body, has been found to be effective against shingles outbreaks. In one double-blind trial, people with an outbreak of shingles were given injections of either 100 mg of AMP or placebo three times a week for four weeks. Compared with the placebo, AMP promoted faster healing and reduced the duration of pain of the shingles. In addition, AMP appeared to prevent the development of postherpetic neuralgia.

How It Works

How to Use It

The trials using AMP for photosensitivity have used 160–200 mg of AMP per day; however, the ideal intake of this supplement has not been determined. Research with shingles has used a special gel form of AMP injected into muscle; a doctor should be consulted for this form of AMP.

Where to Find It

The body creates AMP within cells during normal metabolic processes. AMP is also found as a supplement, although it is not widely available.

Possible Deficiencies

Preliminary research suggests that people with herpes simplex or herpes zoster (shingles) infections may have low levels of AMP; however, the clinical significance of this finding is unclear.1

Interactions

Interactions with Supplements, Foods, & Other Compounds

At the time of writing, there were no well-known supplement or food interactions with this supplement.

Interactions with Medicines

As of the last update, we found no reported interactions between this supplement and medicines. It is possible that unknown interactions exist. If you take medication, always discuss the potential risks and benefits of adding a new supplement with your doctor or pharmacist.
The Drug-Nutrient Interactions table may not include every possible interaction. Taking medicines with meals, on an empty stomach, or with alcohol may influence their effects. For details, refer to the manufacturers' package information as these are not covered in this table. If you take medications, always discuss the potential risks and benefits of adding a supplement with your doctor or pharmacist.

Side Effects

Side Effects

The limited number of human studies involving oral AMP have not indicated any side effects. However, some researchers have expressed concern that supplemental intake of AMP could, in theory, increase levels of adenosine, a substance related to AMP that may interfere with immune function.2 Doctors using AMP injections report that too-rapid intravenous administration or inadvertent administration of an intramuscular injection into a vein could cause life-threatening arrhythmias of the heart.3

References

1. Sklar SH. Herpes virus infection. JAMA 1977;237:871-2.

2. Sherlock CH, Corey L. Adenosine monophosphate for the treatment of varicella zoster infections: A large dose of caution. JAMA 1985;253:1444-5.

3. Gaby AR, Wright JV. Nutritional Therapy in Medical Practice. Proceedings from Nutritional Therapy in Medical Practice Conference, Seattle, WA, Oct 25-8, 1996, 33; gaby@halcyon.com.

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