Carnosine - Adventist HealthCare

Carnosine

Uses

Carnosine is a small molecule composed of the amino acids, histidine and alanine. It is found in relatively high concentrations in several body tissues—most notably in skeletal muscle, heart muscle, and brain.1, 2

What Are Star Ratings?

This supplement has been used in connection with the following health conditions:

Used for Why
2 Stars
Peptic Ulcer (Zinc)
150 mg of zinc carnosine complex twice per day
Studies have shown that a zinc salt of the amino acid carnosine protects against ulcer formation and promotes the healing of existing ulcers.

Experimental animal studies have shown that a zinc salt of the amino acid carnosine exerts significant protection against ulcer formation and promotes the healing of existing ulcers. However, because zinc by itself has been shown to be helpful against peptic ulcer, it is not known how much of the beneficial effect was due to the carnosine. Clinical studies in humans demonstrated that this compound can help eradicate H. pylori, an organism that has been linked to peptic ulcer and stomach cancer. The amount of the zinc carnosine complex used in research studies for eradication of H. pylori is 150 mg twice daily.

1 Star
Peptic Ulcer
Refer to label instructions
Carnisone may protect against ulcer formation and promote the healing of existing ulcers.

Experimental animal studies have shown that a zinc salt of the amino acid carnosine exerts significant protection against ulcer formation and promotes the healing of existing ulcers. However, because zinc by itself has been shown to be helpful against peptic ulcer, it is not known how much of the beneficial effect was due to the carnosine. Clinical studies in humans demonstrated that this compound can help eradicate H. pylori, an organism that has been linked to peptic ulcer and stomach cancer. The amount of the zinc carnosine complex used in research studies for eradication of H. pylori is 150 mg twice daily.

1 Star
Wound Healing
Refer to label instructions
Carnosine, a small molecule composed of the amino acids histidine and alanine, appears to promote wound healing.

Carnosine is a small molecule composed of the amino acids histidine and alanine. The exact biological role of carnosine is not completely understood, but animal research demonstrates that it promotes wound healing. More research is warranted in this area.

How It Works

How to Use It

For eradication of H. pylori, the amount of the zinc carnosine complex used in research studies was 150 mg twice daily. Due to the lack of human clinical trials, recommended levels for other applications are not known at this time.

Where to Find It

Dietary sources of preformed carnosine include meat and poultry and fish.

Possible Deficiencies

Carnosine deficiency may occur in severe protein deficiency and in certain severe genetic disorders characterized by inborn errors in amino acid metabolism.

Interactions

Interactions with Supplements, Foods, & Other Compounds

At the time of writing, there were no well-known supplement or food interactions with this supplement.

Interactions with Medicines

As of the last update, we found no reported interactions between this supplement and medicines. It is possible that unknown interactions exist. If you take medication, always discuss the potential risks and benefits of adding a new supplement with your doctor or pharmacist.
The Drug-Nutrient Interactions table may not include every possible interaction. Taking medicines with meals, on an empty stomach, or with alcohol may influence their effects. For details, refer to the manufacturers' package information as these are not covered in this table. If you take medications, always discuss the potential risks and benefits of adding a supplement with your doctor or pharmacist.

Side Effects

Side Effects

At the time of writing, there were no well-known side effects caused by this supplement.

References

1. Quinn PJ, Boldyrev AA, Formazuyk VE. Carnosine: its properties, functions and potential therapeutic applications. Mol Aspects Med 1992;13:379-444.

2. Bonfanti L, Peretto P, De Marchis S, Fasolo A. Carnosine-related dipeptides in the mammalian brain. Prog Neurobiol 1999;59:333-53.

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