Hemorrhagic Stroke

Hemorrhagic Stroke

Topic Overview

A hemorrhagic stroke develops when a blood vessel (artery) in the brain leaks or bursts (ruptures). This causes bleeding:

Hemorrhagic strokes are not as common as strokes caused by a blood clot (ischemic strokes). But hemorrhagic strokes cause death more often than ischemic strokes. See the difference between an ischemic stroke and a hemorrhagic stroke.

How is hemorrhagic stroke treated?

Treatment includes efforts to control bleeding, reduce pressure in the brain, and stabilize vital signs, especially blood pressure.

  • To stop the bleeding, you may be given medicine or a transfusion of parts of blood, such as plasma. These are given through an IV.
  • You will be closely monitored for signs of increased pressure on the brain. These signs include restlessness, confusion, trouble following commands, and headache. Other measures will be taken to keep you from straining from excessive coughing, vomiting, or lifting, or straining to pass stool or change position.
  • If the bleeding is due to a ruptured brain aneurysm, surgery to repair the aneurysm may be done.
  • In some cases, medicines may be given to control blood pressure, brain swelling, blood sugar levels, fever, and seizures.
  • If a large amount of bleeding has occurred and symptoms are quickly getting worse, you may need surgery to remove the blood that has built up inside the brain and to lower pressure inside the head.

Ask your doctor if a stroke rehab program is right for you. Starting a rehab program as soon as possible after a stroke increases your chances of regaining some of the abilities you lost.

Related Information

References

Other Works Consulted

  • Claude Hemphill J, et al. (2015). Guidelines for the management of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage: A guideline for healthcare professionals from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association. Stroke, 46(7): 2032–2060. DOI: 10.1161/STR.0000000000000069. Accessed June 23, 2015.

Credits

Current as ofSeptember 26, 2018

Author: Healthwise Staff
Medical Review: E. Gregory Thompson, MD - Internal Medicine
Martin J. Gabica, MD - Family Medicine
Adam Husney, MD - Family Medicine
Richard D. Zorowitz, MD - Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

Disclaimer: The information contained in this website, and its associated websites, is provided as a benefit to the local community, and the Internet community in general; it does not constitute medical advice. We try to provide quality information, but we make no claims, promises or guarantees about the accuracy, completeness, or adequacy of the information contained in or linked to this website and its associated sites. As medical advice must be tailored to the specific circumstances of each patient and healthcare is constantly changing, nothing provided herein should be used as a substitute for the advice of a competent physician. Furthermore, in providing this service, Adventist HealthCare does not condone or support all of the content covered in this site. As an Adventist health care organization, Adventist HealthCare acts in accordance with the ethical and religious directives for Adventist health care services.

Find a Doctor

Find an Adventist HealthCare affiliated doctor by calling our FREE physician referral service at 800-642-0101 or by searching our online physician directory.

View Doctors

Set Your Location

Setting your location helps us to show you nearby providers and locations based on your healthcare needs.