Quick Tips: Making Healthy Snacks

Quick Tips: Making Healthy Snacks

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A big part of healthy eating is eating more whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and low-fat milk products. Healthy snacks are a great way to make sure that you get plenty of these nutritious foods every day. Use these ideas to get started.

Make smart snack choices

  • Find healthier substitutes for high-fat snacks. If your favorite high-fat snack is potato chips and dip, try baked tortilla chips with bean dip or hummus instead.
  • Make snacks interesting. If the idea of a plain piece of fruit doesn't appeal to you, try dipping fruit slices in low-fat yogurt sprinkled with cinnamon or nutmeg.
  • Be prepared. Have snacks ready for when you get hungry. For example, keep healthy snacks with you at work or school, in your car, and at home. If you have a healthy snack easily available, it's less likely that you'll pick a candy bar or bag of chips instead.

Foods that make quick, healthy snacks

  • Yogurt
  • String cheese
  • Low-fat microwave popcorn
  • Canned fruit or applesauce in single-serving containers
  • Raisins and other dried fruit
  • Whole wheat crackers
  • Pretzels
  • Flavored rice cakes
  • Unsalted nuts
  • Baby carrots
  • Cherry tomatoes

Snack ideas

  • Combine honey and peanut butter or almond butter for a protein-rich dip for raw apples, carrots, celery, and pretzel sticks. This spread also tastes great on bagels, rice cakes, and whole-grain crackers.
  • Mix fresh or frozen berries with low-fat yogurt. Top with sliced almonds or granola to make a fruit parfait.
  • Top whole-grain crackers with low-fat cottage cheese or ricotta cheese and sliced tomatoes or red pepper strips.
  • Make your own healthy trail mix with high fiber cereal, dried fruit (such as cranberries, blueberries, and dates), and nuts such as almonds. This mix also makes a great topping for yogurt.
  • Spread low-fat cream cheese on a whole-grain bagel. Sprinkle sunflower seeds and raisins on top of the cream cheese for extra flavor.
  • Dip colorful sliced vegetables in low-fat salad dressing or hummus. Try red, yellow, and orange bell peppers; broccoli; cauliflower; and cherry tomatoes.

Credits

Current as ofMarch 28, 2018

Author: Healthwise Staff
Medical Review: Adam Husney, MD - Family Medicine
Martin J. Gabica, MD - Family Medicine
Kathleen Romito, MD - Family Medicine
Rhonda O'Brien, MS, RD, CDE - Certified Diabetes Educator

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