Vaccine Information Statements - Adventist HealthCare

Vaccine Information Statements

Topic Overview

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) creates Vaccine Information Statements (VISs), which have details about most vaccines given in the United States. The VISs are updated when needed.

The information in these statements does not change often. Each VIS explains why to get the vaccine, the risks from the vaccine, what to do if you or your child has a moderate or severe reaction, and more.

If you have any questions about a vaccine, see the CDC website www.cdc.gov/vaccines, or talk to your doctor.

There are Vaccine Information Statements for:

Vaccine Basics

Vaccines help prevent people from getting sick. They also help reduce the spread of disease to others and prevent epidemics. There are many kinds of vaccines. Each vaccine is made up of parts of weakened or killed bacteria or viruses of a specific disease. After you have a vaccine, your body's immune system makes antibodies to fight the disease. If you are exposed to the same disease in the future, the antibodies kill the bacteria or viruses before they have a chance to make you sick.

If you get a vaccine, it may not completely prevent you from getting a disease, but it makes it much less likely. If you get a disease even after you have been vaccinated, it usually will be only a mild case.

Vaccines are usually given by shot (injection). Some are given by mouth as a pill or liquid, or by a spray (aerosol) into the nose. Vaccines are also called immunizations.

Immunization Schedules

In the United States, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and other national organizations advise people about which immunizations they should get and when. Immunization schedules are for healthy children, teens, and adults as well as for people who have health problems and other circumstances, including pregnancy, asthma, or diabetes. To see or print a list of recommended immunizations based on your age, past immunization history, and other factors, see the CDC immunization schedules at www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/index.html.

Children and teens in the United States usually need proof that all their immunizations are up-to-date before they can start school or day care. Also, students of any age entering college usually need to have a written record showing that their immunizations are up-to-date.

For more information on when to get vaccines, see the topic Immunizations.

The CDC may recommend certain immunizations for people who are going to travel to a foreign country. For more information, see the topic Travel Health.

Related Information

References

Other Works Consulted

  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2014). Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommended immunization schedule for adults aged 19 years or older—United States, 2014. MMWR, 63(Early Release): 1–4. http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/pdf/wk/mm63e0203a2.pdf. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2014). Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommended immunization schedules for persons aged 0 through 18 years—United States, 2014. MMWR, 63(Early Release): 1–2. http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/pdf/wk/mm63e0203a1.pdf. Accessed February 4, 2014.

Credits

Current as ofJune 17, 2018

Author: Healthwise Staff
Medical Review: John Pope, MD, MPH - Pediatrics
Kathleen Romito, MD - Family Medicine
Adam Husney, MD - Family Medicine
E. Gregory Thompson, MD - Internal Medicine

Disclaimer: The information contained in this website, and its associated websites, is provided as a benefit to the local community, and the Internet community in general; it does not constitute medical advice. We try to provide quality information, but we make no claims, promises or guarantees about the accuracy, completeness, or adequacy of the information contained in or linked to this website and its associated sites. As medical advice must be tailored to the specific circumstances of each patient and healthcare is constantly changing, nothing provided herein should be used as a substitute for the advice of a competent physician. Furthermore, in providing this service, Adventist HealthCare does not condone or support all of the content covered in this site. As an Adventist health care organization, Adventist HealthCare acts in accordance with the ethical and religious directives for Adventist health care services.

Find a Doctor

Find an Adventist HealthCare affiliated doctor by calling our FREE physician referral service at 800-642-0101 or by searching our online physician directory.

View Doctors

Set Your Location

Setting your location helps us to show you nearby providers and locations based on your healthcare needs.