Screening for Gestational Diabetes

Screening for Gestational Diabetes

Topic Overview

Early detection

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and American Diabetes Association recommend that all women who are not already diagnosed with diabetes be screened for gestational diabetes after the 24th week of pregnancy.footnote 1footnote 2 Most women are screened for gestational diabetes between the 24th and 28th weeks of pregnancy.

After delivery

Even though your gestational diabetes will probably go away after your baby is born, you are at risk for gestational diabetes again and for type 2 diabetes later in life.

You may also have a follow-up glucose tolerance test 4 to 12 weeks after your baby is born or after you stop breastfeeding your baby. If the results of this test are normal, you will still need to be tested for type 2 diabetes at least every 3 years. If that test shows that your blood sugar is slightly high, you may have a condition called prediabetes. If you have prediabetes, you can help prevent type 2 diabetes by changing the way you eat, exercising regularly, and being tested for diabetes every year. For more information, see the topic Prediabetes.

If you want to get pregnant again, you should be tested for type 2 diabetes before you become pregnant.

For more information, see the topic Gestational Diabetes.

References

Citations

  1. American Diabetes Association (2014). Diagnosis and classification of diabetes mellitus. Diabetes Care, 37 (Suppl 1): S81–S90. DOI: 10.2337/dc14-S081. Accessed April 27, 2017.
  2. U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (2014). Screening for gestational diabetes mellitus. http://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/uspstf/uspsgdm.htm. Accessed January 16, 2014.

Other Works Consulted

  • American Diabetes Association (2017). Standards of medical care in diabetes—2017. Diabetes Care, 40(Suppl 1): S1–S135.

Credits

Current as ofJuly 25, 2018

Author: Healthwise Staff
Medical Review: Kathleen Romito, MD - Family Medicine
Adam Husney, MD - Family Medicine
Rebecca Sue Uranga, MD - Obstetrics and Gynecology
Femi Olatunbosun, MB, FRCSC, FACOG - Obstetrics and Gynecology, Reproductive Endocrinology

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