Planning to Be an Organ Donor Upon Death

Overview

Many people who are ill need an organ transplant to live. But there are a lot more organs needed than are available. Many people choose to donate an organ upon their death.

  • If you decide to become a donor, you won't be denied life-saving care when you need it. State laws and emergency medical practices ensure that your life comes first.
  • If you have questions about your religion's views on organ donation, talk to your faith leader. All major religions allow organ donation.

How can you be an organ donor?

The following tips can help you plan to be an organ donor.

  • Get more information.

    Most people can be organ donors. If you are interested in donating organs or tissues, contact the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) at 1-888-894-6361, or go online at www.transplantliving.org to learn more.

  • Put your name on your state's donor registry.

    Many states give you the option to become a donor when you apply for a driver's license or when you renew your license. Other states have a form you can fill out in person or online and file with a state organ donor registry. You can go to www.organdonor.gov to find your state registry. Either way, your name goes on a list of possible donors, and your status is noted on your driver's license. To find out what's required in your state, check with your doctor or call your local Department of Motor Vehicles office.

  • Let your family, friends, and doctor know.

    Include your wish to be an organ donor when you prepare a living will or advance directive.

People of any age can register to be organ donors. In many states there's no minimum age, though an adult might have to sign for someone under age 18.

What organs can you donate?

You can choose what organs and tissues you would like to offer for donation. Or you can choose to donate any organs that are needed. You can also choose to donate for transplant, for research, or for educational purposes.

Organs to donate include:

  • Heart.
  • Liver.
  • Pancreas.
  • Lungs
  • Kidneys.
  • Intestines.

Tissues to donate include:

  • Corneas.
  • Skin.
  • Bone.
  • Blood vessels.
  • Connective tissues, such as tendons.

Credits

Current as of: October 18, 2021

Author: Healthwise Staff
Medical Review:
E. Gregory Thompson MD - Internal Medicine
Adam Husney MD - Family Medicine

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