Pleural Effusion

Pleural Effusion

Conditions Basics

What is pleural effusion?

A pleural effusion (say "PLER-uhl eh-FYOO-zhun") is the buildup of fluid in the space between tissues lining the lungs and the chest wall. Because of the fluid buildup, the lungs may not be able to expand completely. This can make it hard to breathe.

A pleural empyema (say "em-py-EE-muh") is a problem that can happen with pleural effusion. Bacteria or other infections cause pus to form in the pleural fluid. But most pleural effusions don't become infected.

What causes it?

A pleural effusion has many causes. They include pneumonia, cancer, inflammation of the tissues around the lungs, and heart failure.

What are the symptoms?

Symptoms of a pleural effusion may include:

  • Trouble breathing.
  • Shortness of breath.
  • Chest pain.
  • Fever.
  • A cough.

A minor pleural effusion may not cause any symptoms.

How is it diagnosed?

A pleural effusion is usually diagnosed with an X-ray and a physical exam. The doctor listens to the airflow in your lungs.

How is pleural effusion treated?

A pleural effusion can be treated by removing fluid from the space between the tissues around the lungs. This is done with a needle that's put into the chest (thoracentesis). A small amount of the fluid may be sent to a lab to find out what is causing the buildup of fluid.

Removing the fluid may help to relieve symptoms, such as shortness of breath and chest pain. It can help the lungs to expand more fully.

If the pleural effusion doesn't get better, a catheter may be placed in the chest. This is a flexible tube that allows fluid to drain from the lungs. The catheter stays in the chest until the doctor removes it. Some people may get a treatment that removes the fluid and then puts a medicine into the chest cavity. This helps to prevent too much fluid from building up again.

A minor pleural effusion often goes away on its own.

Doctors may need to treat the condition that is causing the pleural effusion. For example, you may get medicines to treat pneumonia or congestive heart failure. When the condition is treated, the effusion usually goes away.

For a pleural empyema, the pus needs to be drained. It may drain from a flexible tube placed in the chest. Or you may have surgery to drain it. You also will get antibiotics.

Credits

Current as of: July 6, 2021

Author: Healthwise Staff
Medical Review:
E. Gregory Thompson MD - Internal Medicine
Adam Husney MD - Family Medicine
Hasmeena Kathuria MD - Pulmonology, Critical Care Medicine, Sleep Medicine

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